INHS - Bulletins

The Illinois Natural History Survey Bulletin has been published continuously since 1876. This peer-reviewed journal reports on significant research findings by INHS scientists and others in the natural sciences. It is our premier scientific serial and has a worldwide distribution. Professional researchers and graduate students contribute to and utilize this series.

 

 


INHS B40-01: Current Distribution and Status of Amphibians and Reptiles In Will County, Illinois.

$10.00
Mauger, D. and Anton, T.G.
2015; 32 pages.

The distribution of amphibians and reptiles in Will County, Illinois, was assessed using museum records and results from 58 surveys conducted between 1986 and 2009 on lands owned and managed by the Forest Preserve District of Will County (FPDWC) and Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR).


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INHS B39-06: A Decade of Monitoring on Pool 26 of the Upper Mississippi River System: Water Quality and Fish Data from the Upper Mississippi River Restoration Environmental Management Program

$10.00
Authors: Chick, J.H., Soeken-Gittinger, L.A., Ratcliff, E.N., Gittinger, E.J., Lubinski, B.J., Maher, R.
2013; 98 pages.

Prologue: A Decade of Monitoring

Since 1991, the Illinois Natural History Survey has operated the Great Rivers Field Station, one of six field stations associated with the Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) of the Upper Mississippi River Restoration Environmental Management Program. This bulletin presents detailed findings for water quality and fish monitoring from 1994 to 2004 in Pool 26 of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) collected and analyzed by scientists at the Great Rivers Field Station. We present this information with the goals of 1) demonstrating the value of these data for management of the natural resources of the UMRS, 2) to serve as an easily accessible vehicle for persons searching for information on environmental conditions in this reach of the UMRS, and 3) to generate hypotheses and questions that can be addressed further in future analyses of LTRMP data and/or through focused research studies. We hope that the findings we present will be useful to river scientists and managers, but we are also hopeful that nonscientists, such as nongovernmental organizations, decision makers, and the general public, will also find this work informative. With this in mind, we have limited ourselves to presenting only basic statistical analyses (e.g., graphs of central tendency and linear regression) with the exception of the last chapter. Long-term monitoring data for natural resources are rare and our understanding of the ecology of great rivers lags far behind most other ecosystems. Improving our management of these important natural resources will require more than the support of scientists and managers; society at large ultimately provides the funding necessary for these efforts and it needs to be informed so that they can judge the value and efficacy of programs such as the LTRMP. We hope that this bulletin will be informative to a wide audience.


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INHS B39-05 Distribution, Habitat, and Zoogeography of the Semifossorial Red-bellied Snake Storeria occipitomaulata (Storer) in Illinois

$10.00
Authors: Lauren E. Brown and Christopher A. Phillips
2012; 26 pages.

The examination of 387 preserved red-bellied snakes, Storeria occipitomaculata, from 18 museums and collections, literature records, and unpublished records revealed distributional records throughout much of Illinois, in contrast to earlier studies which found a more limited distribution. Seventy-one records of habitat types from museum records, field notes, and literature indicated that the species occupies woodlands but is not primarily forest adapted. It also inhabits prairie and prairielike habitats in Illinois. The common occurrence of this pecies in this type of habitat has not heretofore been reported elsewhere in the range of the snake. Our findings do not support an older zoogeographic theory that assumed the snake was nonadapted for prairie and thus excluded from the Prairie Peninsula. We propose that the species was able to occupy the area near the ice rim of the Wisconsin Episode glaciation, and followed the glaciation as it retreated because of the snake's cold tolerance, ability to inhabit northern prairies and coniferous forests, vivipary, with allows thermoregulation by gravid females, and the relatively temperate climate along the glacial rim. Within recent times, it seems likely that the snake was extirpated throughout much of the former prairie by destructive changes associated with agriculture.


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INHS B39-04: Status of Endangered and Threatened Sand Area Species of the Illinois Flora

$10.00
Authors: Loy R. Phillippe, Brenda Molano-Flores, Michael J.C. Murphy, Paul B. Marcum, and John Ebinger
2011; 38 pages.

The sand deposits in Illinois occur on glacial outwash plains from the Wisconsinan glaciation that ended 8,000 to 10,000 years before present. Approximately 70 species of endangered and threatened plants are known to grow in these deposits. In the course of gathering data for Bulletin 39(4), we determined the habitat fidelity and natural community types for 40 of these species that are restricted to glacial drift sand habitats. Plant community types, associated species, moisture requirements, and other data concerning each of the plant species were determined by reviewing the pertinent literature, searching the Illinois Department of Natural Resources Natural Heritage Database, through discussions with botanists and natural heritage biologists, examination of herbarium specimens, and our studies of the vegetation of the Illinois sand deposits. Throughout the course of these studies, most of the nature preserves, state parks, and identified natural areas in the sand regions were visited on numerous occasions and vegetation surveys undertaken. The information presented in this bulletin could allow rare plant conservation in Illinois to become more proactive by encouraging the selection of sites where in situ conservation efforts could be conducted by state, local, and nongovernmental organizations.


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INHS B39-03: Review of the Species of New World Erythroneurini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae) IV. Genus Eryatoneura

$10.00
Authors: Dmitry A. Dmitriev and Christopher H. Dietrich
2010; 180 pages.


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INHS B39-02: Vascular Plant Communities of the Green River Lowlands in Northwestern Illinois

$10.00
Authors: Ebinger, J.E., L.R. Phillipe, W.C. Handel, C.J. Cunningham, W.E. McClain, R.N. Nyboer, and T. Bittner
2009; 78 pages.

A few high-quality prairies still exist in the sand deposits of the Green River Lowlands. The most extensive remnants are in the Green River State Wildlife Area, Lee County, Illinois. Three upland prairie communities were surveyed; a dry sand prairie dominated by Schizachyrium scoparium, Ambrosia psilostachya, and Amorpha canescens; a dry-mesic sand prairie dominated by Sorghastrum nutans, Schizachyrium scoparium, Antennaria plantaginifolia, and Liatris aspera; and a mesic sand prairie where Sorghastrum nutans and Andropogon gerardii were the dominant grasses, and Parthenium integrifolium, Fragaria virginiana, Liatris pycnostachya, and Euthamia gymnospermoides the common forbs. The lowlands, which included approximately 325 ha, were dominated by the exotic Phalaris arundinacea, but high-quality wet sand prairie, sedge meadow, and marsh communities existed. The wet sand prairies were dominated by Spartina pectinata, Helianthus grosseserratus, and Solidago canadensis; the sedge meadows were dominated by Carex haydenii, Calamagrostis canadensis, and Persicaria coccinea; the marsh communities were divided into distinct vegetation zones. These vegetation zones were surveyed in 2002 and subjected to an extensive uncontrolled fire in 2005. Surveys completed in 2006 and 2007 were used to determine successional changes resulting from the fire. These studies suggested that most communities were returning to the species composition found before the 2005 fire.


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INHS B39-01: Nesting Biology of Mallards in West-central Illinois

$10.00
Authors: Yetter, A.P., J.D. Stafford, C.S. Hine, M.W. Bower, S.P. Havera, and M.M. Horath
2009; 38 pages.

The number of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) breeding in Illinois and eastern North America has increased in recent decades; however, few studies have investigated the nesting biology of Mallards outside primary production areas. Therefore, we radiomarked resident female Mallards (n = 148) in west-central Illinois during 1998–2003 to assess nesting parameters and evaluate recruitment. Mean initiation date for first nests ranged from 22 April to 6 May, and the majority (75%) of nests were initiated by 20 May. Therefore, the majority of nests were predicted to hatch by 24 June. The nesting season averaged 88 days (range: 77–103 days). The proportion of unsuccessful females that renested ranged from 50.0–85.7%, and adults were more likely to renest (75.0%) than yearlings (48.0%). Nest success ranged from 9.8–33.3% and was 19.6% overall; hen success was 28.3%. Initial brood size was 8.2 ± 0.3 ducklings, but brood size declined to 3.0 ± 0.6 ducklings by 17 days posthatch. Brood survival to 20 days was 0.759 ± 0.081, and 20-day duckling survival was 0.413 ± 0.035. Female survival during spring-summer ranged from 0.546–1.00 and averaged 0.710 ± 0.096. Likewise, estimated Mallard recruitment varied annually (range: 0.302–0.672 female ducklings/female). Assuming constant female and duckling survival, we estimated that a recruitment rate of 0.613 female ducklings/adult female was necessary to maintain a stable Mallard breeding population in west-central Illinois. Estimated Mallard reproduction and recruitment was similar to that observed in other areas of North America. Nest success and hen success approached or exceeded estimated thresholds for population stability in most years; however, hen success averaged over the study period was insufficient for local population maintenance and growth. Female survival was comparable to that observed in other studies but may have limited population growth in some years. Duckling survival was sufficient for population maintenance. Management designed to enhance hen success and brood habitat may augment Mallard recruitment in west-central Illinois.


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INHS B38-06: Review of the Species of New World Erythroneurini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae) III. Genus Erythridual

$10.00
Authors: Dmitry A. Dmitriev and Christopher H. Dietrich
2009; 120 pages.

This review provides descriptions, color habitus photos, illustrations, a key for identification, and summaries of distributions and host plants for all known species of the genus Erythridula (135 species). E. canadensis sp.n. from British Columbia (Canada), E. planerae sp.n. from southernIllinois (USA), and E. wyatti sp.n. from southeastern USA are described as new; 129 new synonyms are recognized; a lectotype is designated for Typhlocyba obliqua var. dorsalis Gillette; neotypes are designated for E. lloydi Hepner and E. lasteri Hepner; E. rhodedendronae Hepner is emended to E. rhododendronae Hepner.


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INHS B38-05: Contaminants in Unionid Mussels from the Confluence of the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers

$10.00
Authors: Joan Esarey, David J. Soucek, Jeffrey M. Levengood, Robert J. Hudson, Wade Wimer, Richard S. Halbrook
2008; 18 pages.

Unionid mussels were collected from three mussel beds near the confluence of the Mississippi and Illinois rivers in 2003 to evaluate concentrations of selected elements and organic compounds in three abundant species and to preliminarily investigate the relative contribution of these waterways to observed contaminant burdens. Copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) concentrations were higher and lead (Pb) concentrations were lower in Amblema plicata collected downstream of the confluence than in those collected upstream. Mean concentrations of nickel (Ni), total mercury (Hg), methylmercury (MeHg), Pb, and Zn varied by species. Concentrations of cadmium (Cd) decreased with age in A. plicata from two of three sites. Tissue concentrations of some elements, e.g., arsenic (As), Cd, Cu, Pb, Se, and Zn, were similar to or higher than those previously reported for unionid mussels from areas of contaminated sediment. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Zn in A. plicata were comparable to those collected from the Mississippi River approximately 450 and 900 km upstream from our study sites (Naimo et al. 1992). Although total Hg concentrations we observed were an order of magnitude lower than in that study, MeHg concentrations were above those associated with reductions in soft tissue mass in a study of Elliptio complanata (Salazar et al. 1995). A number of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were detected in A. plicata tissues, with 85% of detections occurring in mussels from downstream of the confluence. Concentrations of individual PCB congeners were £33 ng/g ww and the maximum summed PCB congener concentration was 100.2 ng/g ww. Although few persistent pesticides were detected, b-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) was detected in each of the species collected from below the confluence of the two rivers, and in A. plicata collected above it on both the Mississippi and Illinois rivers, at a maximum concentration of 103.5 ng/g ww. Aldrin, d-HCH and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) were detected in few of the specimens collected. The findings of this preliminary investigation suggest that unionid mussels from near the confluence of the Mississippi and Illinois rivers may be at risk of negative health effects of elevated exposure to certain environmental contaminants. Studies examining the health and productivity of unionid mussels from this area appear warranted.


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INHS B38-04: Vascular Flora of Middle Fork Woods Nature Preserve, Vermilion County, Illinois

$10.00
Authors: Larimore, Richard L., Phillippe, Loy R., Ebinger, John E.
2008; 20 pages.


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INHS B38-03: Review of the Species of New World Erythroneurini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae) II. Genus Zyginama

$10.00
Authors: Dietrich, Christopher H., Dmitriev, Dmitry A.
2008; 47 pages.


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INHS B38-02: Review of the New World Erythroneurini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae) I. Genera Erythroneura, Erasmoneura, Rossmoneura, and Hymetta

$10.00
Authors: Dmitriev, Dmitry A., Dietrich, Christopher H.
2007; 122 pages.

This review provides descriptions, illustrations, keys for identification, and summaries of distributions and host plants for all known species of the genera Erythroneura (54 species), Erasmoneura (12 species), Rossmoneura (3 species), and Hymetta (5 species). Erythroneura browni sp.n., E. ortha sp.n., E. carinata sp.n., E. glabra sp.n., E. bakeri sp.n., E. kerzhneri sp.n. from Central and Eastern USA, E. triapitsyni sp.n. from New Mexico, Erasmoneura margaritae sp.n. from Illinois, and E. emeljanovi sp.n. from South Carolina are described as new. The following new synonyms are recognized: Erythroneura prima Beamer equals E. maritima Hamilton syn. n.; E. diva McAtee equals E. tricincta var. complementa McAtee syn. n.; E. octonotata Walsh equals E. comes var. compta McAtee syn. n., E. cherokee Robinson syn. n., E. compta var. rufomaculata McAtee syn. n., and E. nigroscuta Johnson syn. n.; E. cymbium McAtee equals E. tricincta var. disjuncta McAtee syn. n.; E. calycula McAtee equals E. tricincta var. erasa McAtee syn. n. and E. tricincta var. noncincta Johnson syn. n.; E. ziczac Walsh equals E. ziczac var. walshi Beamer syn. n.; E. delicata McAtee equals E. comes var. accepta McAtee syn. n., E. scripta Robinson syn. n., and E. tudella Robinson syn. n.; E. rosa Robinson equals E. repetita McAtee, syn. n.; E. kerzhneri sp.n. equals E. vaga sensu Beamer, 1938 (not Johnson, 1934); Erasmoneura vulnerata Fitch equals E. gradata Robinson syn. n.; Erasmoneura fulmina McAtee equals E. bicolorata Beamer syn. n.; Erasmoneura nigra Gillette equals E. vulnerata var. decora McAtee syn. n.; Erasmoneura nigerrima McAtee equals E. atrata Johnson syn. n.; Hymetta balteata McAtee equals H. trifasciata var. albata McAtee syn. n. and H. balteata var. mediana Fairbairn syn. n.; H. anthisma McAtee equals H. distincta Fairbairn syn. n.; Erasmoneura atra Johnson, 1935 is restored and equal to E. nigerrima sensu Beamer, 1946 (not McAtee, 1920).


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INHS B38-01: Distribution, Abundance, and Habitat Associations of Franklin's Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus franklinii Sabine 1822)

$10.00
Authors: Huebschman, J.J.; C. Warwick, Ed.
2007; 58 pages.

To better inform conservation and management strategics directed at Franklin’s ground squirrel, Spermophilus franklinii, I reviewed published and unpublished accounts of the squirrel’s distribution, abundance, and principally, habitat associations. I present the body of literature on S. franklinii and include portions of original accounts to avoid potential bias from paraphrasing. A consensus of the literature indicates that S. franklinii is most frequently associated with habitat characterized by a mixture of grassy and woody vegetation, referred to as savanna-like or parkland habitat. Moreover, S. franklinii has had an affinity for this type of habitat throughout its geographic range in recent, historic, and even prehistoric times. This is in contrast to a view of the species as primarily associated with tallgrass prairie habitat. As indicated in the literature, populations of S. franklinii are subject to marked fluctuations, which probably are influenced by local disturbances in addition to regular dispersal events. In the southern part of its geographic range, S. franklinii is currently limited in its occurrence principally to roadside and railroad right-of-ways. In these southern regions S.franklinii is justifiably of conservation concern. I suggest that more detailed surveys for the species (such as those that have recently occurred in Illinois and Missouri) take place in Iowa and Kansas.


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INHS B37-06: The Vegetation & Flora of the Sand Deposits of the Mississippi River Valley

$10.00
Authors: Ebinger, J., Phillippe, L., Nyboer, R., McClain, W., Busemeyer, D., Robertson, K., Levin, G.
2006; 48 pages.


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INHS B37-05: Review of the New World Genera of the Leafhopper Tribe Erythroneurini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae)

$10.00
Authors: Dietrich, C.H., D.A. Dmitriev; C. Warwick, ed.
2006; 71 pages.

The genus-level classification of New World Erythroneurini is revised based on results of a phylogenetic analysis of 100 morphological characters. The 704 known species are placed into 18 genera. Erasmoneura Young and Eratoneura Young, previously treated as subgenera of Erythroneura Fitch, and Erythridula Young, most recently treated as a subgenus of Arboridia Zachvatkin, are elevated to generic status. Three species previously included in Erasmoneura are placed in a new genus, Rossmoneura (type species, Erythroneura tecta McAtee). The concept of Erythroneura is thereby narrowed to include only those species previously included in the nominotypical subgenus. New World species previously included in Zygina Fieber are not closely related to the European type species of that genus and are therefore placed in new genera. Neozygina, n. gen., based on type species Erythroneura ceonothana Beamer, includes all species previously included in the “ceonothana group”, and Zyginama, n. gen., based on type species Erythroneura ritana Beamer, includes most species previously included in the “ritana group” of New World Zygina. Five additional new genera are described to include other previously described North American Erythroneurini: Hepzygina, n. gen., based on type species Erythroneura milleri Beamer and also including E. aprica McAtee; Mexigina, n. gen., based on type species Erythroneura oculata McAtee; Nelionidia, n. gen., based on type species N. pueblensis, n, sp., three additional new species, and Erythroneura amicis Ross; Neoimbecilla, n. gen., based on type species Erythroneura kiperi Beamer and one new species; and Illinigina, n. gen., based on type species Erythroneura illinoiensis Gillette. Five new genera, based on previously undescribed species, are also recognized: Aztegina, n. gen, based on A. punctinota, n. sp., from Mexico; Amazygina, n. gen., based on type species A. decaspina, n. sp., and three additional new species from Ecuador; Hamagina, n. gen., based on type species H. spinigera, n. sp., and two additional new species from Peru and Ecuador; Napogina, n. gen., based on type species N. recta, n. sp., and one additional new species from Ecuador; Perugina, n. gen., based on type species P. denticula, n. sp., from Peru; and Spinigina, n. gen., based on type species S. hirsuta, n. sp., and an additional new species from Peru. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the New World Erythroneurini consist of three lineages resulting from separate invasions from the Old World.


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INHS B37-03-04: Black-crowned Night-Herons of the Lake Calumet Region, Chicago, Illinois

$10.00
Article 3: Levengood, J.M., Marcisz, W.J., Klement, A.M., Kurcz, M.A.. Nesting Ecology of Black-crowned Night-Herons at Lake Calumet Wetlands.

Article 4: Marcisz, W.J., Levengood, J.M., Klement, A.M., Kurcz, M.A.. Population Trends in a Black-crowned Night-Heron Colony at Lake Calumet Wetlands.

2005; 27 pages.


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INHS INHS B37-01-02 A Revision of the Bees of the Genus Andrena of the Western Hemisphere.

$10.00
Authors: LaBerge, W.E., Thorp, R.W.
2005; 93 pages.


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INHS B36-05: The Winter Stoneflies of Illinois (Insecta: Plecoptera): 100 Years of Change

$10.00
Authors: Webb, D. W.; T. Rice and C. Warwick, eds.
2002; 79 pages.

Winter stoneflies (Insecta: Plecoptera) are an aquatic group of insects whose adults emerge in Illinois from late November to early April. Twenty-one species have been reported from Illinois. Extensive collections of winter stoneflies were made in Illinois during the 1920s and 1930s by Frison, the 1960s by Ross and “the winter stonefly club”, and the 1990s by Webb. These specimens are housed in the Insect Collection of the Illinois Natural History Survey and allowed for an evaluation of the current status of these species following a century of environmental change.


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INHS B36-04: Natural History of the Wood Frog (Rana sylvatica) in the Shawnee National Forest, Southern Illinois

$10.00
Authors: Redmer, M.; T. Rice and C. Warwick, eds.
2002; 31 pages.

The wood frog (Rana sylvatica), an uncommon species in Illinois, was studied in the Shawnee National forest in the extreme southern part of the state. Frogs were documented from 20 localities in 5 counties (Jackson, Hardin, Pope, Saline, and Union) in the Shawnee Hills and Ozark Natural Divisions. Eggs or tadpoles were observed in 30 aquatic breeding sites, including ephemeral ponds and depressions, semi-permanent ponds, human-made ponds, roadside ditches, and ruts (caused by vehicles) in dirt trails. Surrounding habitat included floodplain and upland deciduous, coniferous, and mixed deciduous/coniferous forests. One population, which bred in at least 13 ponds or flooded depressions in southern Jackson County, was studied more intensively between 1993 and 1997. Explosive breeding took place in this population in late winter and coincided with surface soil temperatures of 9degree C, and less so with warm rains and specific air temperatures. Skeletochronologicaly estimated age of breeding adults was compared to SVL, fecundity, and by mate data 9 SVL and age). There were moderate positive correlations between ages and SVLs of males and of females. There were no correlations between ages and SVLs of amplexed mates. Clutch size was more strongly correlated to female SVL than to female age, and mean ovum diameter was negatively correlated to clutch size.


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INHS B36-03: Revision of the Bees of the Genus Tetraloniella in the New World (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

$10.00
Authors: LaBerge, W.E.; C. Warwick, ed.
2001; 95 pages.

The genus Tetraloniella was proposed by Ashmead in 1899 (p. 61) to include a small Palearctic eucerine bee, Macrocera graia Eversmann, know to Ashmead only in the female sex. This specimen and several others of this species have been examined by the present author but no male specimen has come available, thus the critical characters of the terminalia have not been studied. Nonetheless, the author is convinced from the female characters that Tetraloniella of Europe and Asia is the same genus as Xenoglossodes, also named by Ashmead (p. 63) later in the same paper. Michener, McGinley, and Danforth (1994:158) refer to the genus under the name Tetraloniella but suggest that, “… the synonymy of Xenoglossodes and Tetraloniella is uncertain.” This author agrees that our current knowledge of this interesting genus is incomplete. The synonymy of Xenoglossodes and Tetraloniella, however, appears to be correct and this author will continue to use the latter name for the genus. A total of 6,504 specimens were studied representing 35 species, of which 19 are new to science. A total of 14 names are listed as synonyms and 1 name is recognized as a junior homonym and renamed. Complete descriptions for all species and keys for the diagnoses of both sexes are included when possible.


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INHS B36-02: Natural History of the Bird-Voiced (Hyla avivoca) and Green Treefrog (Hyla cinerea) in Southern Illinois

$10.00
Authors: Redmer, M., L.E. Brown, and R.A. Brandon; Rice, T., ed.
1999; 29 pages.

The bird-voiced treefrog, Hyla avivoca Viosca 1928, Figures 1 and 2, and green treefrog, Hyla cinerea (Schneider 1799), Figures 3 and 4, are distributed primarily on the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains of the southeastern United States (Conant and Collins 1998). The ranges of both species reach their northern limits in the Midwest in southern Illinois where Smith (1961) recorded them from Alexander, Jackson, and Union Counties. Because the few documented localities of these treefrogs in Illinois were, until recently, mainly in or near remnant Austroriparian swamplands (which are disappearing rapidly), concern has been expressed that their continued existence in the state is in jeopardy (Ackerman 1975; Ashton et al. 1976; Dyrkacz 1974). Since Smith's (1961) comprehensive study The Amphibians and Reptiles of Illinois, few additional records for these species have been reported. Garton and Brandon (1975) studied reproductive ecology and habitat of H. cinerea at a southern Illinois swamp, but there has been no previous in-depth environmental examination of H. avivoca in Illinois. The objective of this publication is to report the results of our study of the natural history of these two poorly known treefrogs in southern Illinois.


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INHS B36-01: Actue Toxicity of Ingested Zinc Shot to Game-Farm Mallards

$10.00
Authors: Levengood, J.M., G.C. Sanderson, W.L. Anderson, G.L. Foley, L.M. Skowron, P.W. Brown, and J.W. Seets; T.E. Rice, ed.
1999; 36 pages.

We conducted a 30-day acute toxicity test of zinc (Zn) shot using 6- to 8-month-old wild-type game-farm Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), 40 of which (20 males and 20 females) were dosed with 6 No. 4 candidate shot pellets containing 98% Zn and 2% tin (Sn); the remaining 40 ducks were dosed with 6 No. 4 steel (Fe) shot and served as controls. The Zn shot resulted in high mortality, with a greater proportion of females dying than males. For the 30-day study, survival averaged 18 and 23 days for female and male Zn-dosed ducks, respectively; all Fe-dosed ducks survived to Day 30. Ataxia/paresis and other signs of intoxication were noted in a large portion of Zn-dosed ducks. For all ducks retaining 6 shot pellets, including those that survived < 30 days, shot retention, percent of the original shot weight dissolved, and dissolution rates were similar for Zn- and Fe-dosed ducks. For those ducks that retained 6 pellets and survived to Day 30, percent loss of the original shot weight and the dissolution rate were higher in Zn-dosed ducks.


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INHS B35-05: Annotated Catalog of Type Specimens in the Illinois Natural History Survey Fish Collection

$10.00
Authors: Sabaj, M.H., K.S. Cummings, and L.M. Page; T.E. Rice, ed.
1997; 47 pages.

This catalog is divided into two sections: (1) type specimens presently located in the Fish Collection of the Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS), and (2) type specimens originally deposited in the Illinois State Laboratory of Natural History (ISLNH), but not currently found in the INHS collection (i.e., species whose types are either missing entirely or represented only by ISLNH specimens donated to other museums). In both sections, species and subspecies are presented alphabetically within families, and the families are arranged phylogenetically according to Nelson (1994). Photographs of type specimens are presented for 15 species described between 1876 and 1905 by S.A. Forbes, D.S. Jordan, E.W. Nelson, and R.E. Richardson. Except for Parascaphirhynchus albus Forbes and Richardson 1905, these species were not figured in their original description and photographs of the type specimens have never been published.


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INHS B35-03/04: Acute Toxicity of Ingested Bismuth Alloy Shot in Game-farm Mallards

$10.00
Authors: Sanderson, Glen C.Anderson, William L.Foley, George L.Skowron, Loretta M.Brawn, Jeffrey D.Seets, James W.
1997; 252 pages.


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INHS B35-02: The Fishes of Champaign County, Illinois, During a Century of Alterations of a Prairie Ecosystem

$10.00
Authors: Larimore, R.W. and P.B. Bayley; T.E. Rice and C. Warwick, eds.
1996; 130 pages.

1. Much of Champaign County has been converted from marsh and tallgrass prairie to well-drained fertile farmland. Its streams were modified by dredging, tiling, silting, and other influences that accompanied agriculture. 2. Stream fishes in the six drainage basins of the county were sampled in the same locations in the late 1890s, 1928, 1959-60, and 1987-88. Ninety-two species were recorded in the county during these four surveys. Eighteen species previously recorded were not collected in the recent survey. Of these 18, 16 were never common in the county and 6 are listed as Illinois endangered species. With species disappearing and new ones occurring, the total number of species collected in the most recent three (of four) surveys has remained virtually the same-73, 73, 74. 3. Based upon data from the last three surveys, tests of association and time trends indicated that 12 taxa (species or species complexes that occurred in five or more samples from two or more surveys) in a subset of 47 taxa generally increased in percentage of occurrence, while 5 taxa decreased. Ten taxa showed more complex changes and the remaining 20 taxa showed no significant association or trend. Mean species richness per sample, after correcting for gear efficiency differences, dropped drastically between 1928 and 1959 during the time that water quality deteriorated rapidly. 4. Biomass of large predatory species (mostly sportfishes) increased during the past 30 years but in the county the physical habitat apparently limits the distribution and abundance of most of these species. 5. Urban spread has taken much agricultural land and reduced water retention in the floodplains, while the reduction of cattle grazing and the use of conservation tillage have improved the streams. 6. Habitat parameters varied little among most sites. However, fish communities were distinguishable on the basis of discriminant functions related to river size that were influenced primarily by mean depth, drainage area, and specific conductance, and secondarily by riparian crops and soluble reactive phosphorous. 7. Historical evidence indicates that poor water quality was a major limiting factor for most fishes in Champaign County in the 1950s. Results from the recent survey indicate that water quality has been greatly improved during the past 30 years with the elimination of chronic pollution in seven principal areas. 8. The limiting physical habitat is still a function of land-use practices associated with agriculture, particularly channelization and channel maintenance for drainage. Although the dredged streams may never be allowed to regain the diversity of habitat that existed before channelization, some farmers and drainage engineers are limiting channel maintenance and permitting the development of instream meanders, bars, pools, and bank vegetation. Most of the fishes of Champaign County quickly respond to these habitat improvements.


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$5.00 On Sale!
INHS B35-01: Non-Native Fishes Inhabiting the Streams and Lakes of Illinois

$10.00
Authors: Laird, C.A. and L.M. Page
1996; 51 pages.


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INHS B34-04: Our Living Heritage: The Biological Resources of Illinois

$4.00
Authors: Page, L.M. and M.R. Jeffords, eds.
1991; 120 pages.


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INHS B34-02: Aster and Brachyactis in Illinois

$4.00
Author: Jones, A.G.
1989; 55 pages.


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INHS B33-04: The Crayfishes and Shrimps (Decapoda) of Illinois

$4.00
Author: Page, L.M.
1985; 113 pages.


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INHS B33-01: The Diptera, or True Flies, of Illinois. I Tabanidae

$4.00
Authors: Pechuman, L.L., D.W. Webb, and H.J. Teskey
1983; 122 pages.

The tabanids, or horse flies and deer flies, are well known to dairy farmers and livestock producers as well as to campers, fishermen, and outdoor enthusiasts as annoying and pain-inflicting inhabitants of most wooded areas of Illinois. These large and persistent flies impart a painful bite and can occur in large enough numbers to make canoeing and hiking virtually impossible. The tabanid fauna of Illinois has never been studied, although several of the surrounding states have published various reports: Indiana (Burton 1975; Meyer & Sanders 1975), Wisconsin (Roberts & Dicke 1958), Iowa (Richards & Knight 1967), Missouri (Andrews & Wingo 1975), Tennessee (Goodwin 1966), Michigan (Hays 1956), Ohio (Hine 1903), Minnesota (Phillip 1931), and Arkansas (Schwardt 1936; Schwardt & Hall 1930). This study is intended to make available in brief form our present knowledge of the tabanids in the central United States, with keys for their determination, and the distribution of those species occurring in Illinois. No attempt is made to give detailed taxonomic descriptions of species. If needed, these can be found for most species in the papers of Brennan (1935) and Stone (1938). Philip (1954, 1955) has keys to all the North American Pangoniinae and Chrysopsinae known at the time. the most recent list of the North American species of Tabanidae is given by Philip (1965).


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INHS B31-07: Mecoptera, or Scorpionflies, of Illinois

$4.00
Authors: Webb, D.W., N.D. Penny, and J.C. Marlin
1975; 65 pages.

The objective of this study is to update our knowledge of the distribution and natural history of Mecoptera, particularly in relation to the biogeographic history of Illinois. Synoptic descriptions, keys, and illustrations have been prepared to provide an insight into this primitive and interesting group of insects. The emphasis of this study is on the fauna of Illinois, but other species occurring in the Midwest have been included. Collecting data are listed for those Illinois species known from fewer than ten localities. Records for other species are plotted on distribution maps.


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INHS B30-07: Comparative Study of Two Components of the Poinsettia Root Rot Complex

$4.00
Author: Perry, R.S.
1971; 34 pages.

Since more research has been conducted on P. ultimum and R. solani than on T. basicola, the present research was originally designed to investigate some of the environmental factors affecting the growth of Thielaviopsis and the development of the root rot caused by it. However, another fungus, Chalaropsis thielavioides Peyronel, frequently was obtained in isolations from diseased greenhouse poinsettias. Since C. thielavioides had not been reported as being a part of the poinsettia root rot complex, the author decided to investigate its importance as a pathogen on poinsettias. Numerous similarities between C. thielavioides and T. basicola were evident. The object of this work was to compare the two fungi. Prior to undertaking such a study, the pathogenicity of Chalaropsis on poinsettias had to be established. A comparison of Chalaropsis and two isolates of Thielaviopsis was made to determine the effects of environment on the growth of the fungi and the ability of the two fungi to produce disease symptoms poinsettias.


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INHS B30-05: A Survey of the Mussels (Unionacea) of the Illinois River: A Polluted Stream

$4.00
Author: Starrett, W.C.
1971; 136 pages.

The basic purposes of this investigation were to make a survey of the pearly mussel (Mussel: Pelecypoda: Unionacea) populations of the entire Illinois River in order to formulate a sound basis for managing the mussel resource of this river, and to determine what species and distributional changes had taken place during the past century.


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INHS B29-03: Hybridization of Four Species of Sunfishes (Centrarchidae)

$4.00
Author: Childers, W.F.
1967; 55 pages.

Four species of sunfishes in the tribe Lepomini (red-ear sunfish, bluegill, green sunfish, and warmouth) were selected as experimental species because of local availability; importance to sport fishing; taxonomic relationships; and similarities and differences in their morphology, habitat selection, and reproductive behavior.


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INHS B29-02: Stocking and Sport Fishing at Lake Glendale (Illinois)

$4.00
Author: Hansen, D.F.
1966; 53 pages.

Various bass-bluegill stocking procedures employing fry or fingerlings, adult fish alone, or mixtures of adults and fingerlings have been evaluated by Serber (1949), Swingle (1951), and Smith, Kirkwood, & Hall (1955). In these studies, stocking success was measured in such terms as standing crops of young and adult fish, balance of bass and bluegills, or evidence of overpopulation of one or both species. The principal basis for evaluation of the stocking procedures at Lake Glendale was the quality of the hook-and-line fishing. Neither of the stocking procedures used in the present study was among those reported by other workers. The 1940 stocking rates for adult largemouth bass and bluegills were almost the same as the rates used by the Illinois Department of Natural Conservation when it provides adult fish for large publicly-owned waters. For this reason, the results of the present study have special significance in this state.


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INHS B28-03: The Comparative Study of Bird Populations in Illinois, 1906-1909 and 1956-1958

$4.00
Authors: Graber, R.R. and J.W. Graber
1963; 145 pages.

On August 29, 1906, Alfred O. Gross and Howard A. Ray, working for the Illinois State Laboratory of Natural History (a parent organization of the Illinois Natural History Survey) under the direction of Stephen A. Forbes, began a series of statewide, cross-country censuses of birds in Illinois. These censuses were continued at intervals until September, 1909, and the data collected were published in a series of papers (Forbes 1907, 1908, 1913; Forbes & Gross 1921, 1922, 1923) that provided a quantitative record of the Illinois bird populations of that period and a potential basis for evaluating the adjustment of bird populations to a changing environment. In 1956-1958, we conducted statewide censuses similar to those of the 1906-1909 survey. In this paper we present an analysis of our field data and compare these data with those from the first survey.


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INHS B27-01: Ecological Life History of the Warmouth (Centrarchidae)

$4.00
Author: Larimore, R.W.
1957; 83 pages.

The ecological life history of the warmouth, Chaenobryttus gulosus (Cuvier), was studied intensively in two habitats of Central Illinois: Venard Lake, a 3.2-acre artificial impoundment stocked only with warmouths and largemouth bass, and Park Pond, and 18-acre flooded stripmine area containing a fish population of 36 species. The intensive investigations in these two areas were supplemented by observations in other habitats and by published records on warmouth habitats and populations.


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INHS B26-05: Hill Prairies of Illinois

$4.00
Author: Evers, R.A.
1955; 79 pages.

These authors were only concerned with the local occurrences of hill prairies in Illinois. They did not report on the extent of hill prairies in the state, nor did they report in detail on the flora of the hill prairies, the characteristic plants, relative abundance, presence and space relations as determinable in plot studies, or the origin and history of hill prairies. In order to obtain the necessary information for a study of these characteristics of hill prairies and for a description of hill prairie vegetation in Illinois, the writer made numerous plant collections and plant identifications from 61 hill prairies, fig. 1, having a combined area of more than 200 acres. Detailed data pertaining to the vegetation were obtained from two prairies by use of plot studies, as explained in a later section of this paper.


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INHS B24-03: The Bass-Bluegill Combination in a Small Artifical Lake

$4.00
Author: Bennett, G.W.
1948; 35 pages.

The investigation of Fork Lake was originally planned to study the effect of heavy cropping upon the combination of largemouth bass and bluegills in a small artificial lake or pond. The results obtained were influenced by the unexpected spread of Potamogeton foliosus in this pond, and a proposed final fish census was rendered impossible by a washout of the dam in 1942.


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INHS B24-01: The Mosquitoes of Illinois (Diptera, Culicidae)

$4.00
Author: Ross, H.H.
1947; 96 pages.

The object of this paper is to provide means for making mosquito control programs more effective, first by furnishing illustrated keys and descriptions for the identification of mosquito species that occur in Illinois and states similar in climate, and second by summarizing information regarding the distribution, biology, and habitat preferences of the species.


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INHS B22-06,07: Combination Bulletin - $4.00

      • Survey of the Illinois Fur Resource

            Author: Brown, L.G. and L.E. Yeager
            1943; 70 pages.

      • Illinois Furbearer Distribution and Income

            Author: Mohr, C.O.
            1943;337 pages

Distributional information information and annual catch data derived from fur-takers' monthly reports are at hand for most of the trapping seasons beginning with 1929-30 and ending with 1939-40 and are here recorded, along with records of the number of licensed fur-takers and estimates of their catch. After being compared with findings of the oral survey, raw data reports were revised in such a way as to show better than heretofore how the value of the fur catch has stood from year to year. Data for the seasons of 1931-32, 1932-33 and 1933-34 were not available to the writer, and these seasons therefore could not be considered in this study.


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INHS B22-01: The Plant Bugs, or Miridae, of Illinois

$4.00
Author: Knight. H.H.
1941; 234 pages.

The list of Miridae of Illinois now stands at 330 species. It is apparent, however, that species known from neighboring states will eventually be found in Illinois. Furthermore, in the study of Illinois species, it was found that many records of these species were a great distance from any other previously known records. Hence, it was thought advisable to include in the keys other species and varieties known from the entire general region in which Illinois is situated. One hundred ten extralimital species were, therefore, included, bringing the total number treated in this report to 440 species. It seems highly probable that from two-thirds to three-fourths of these extralimital species will eventually be found in this state, which would bring the list of Illinois Miridae to about 400 species.


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INHS B21-06,07: Combination Bulletin - $4.00

      • Preliminary Investigation of Oak Diseases in Illinois

            Author: Carter, J.C.
            1941; 36 pages.

      • A Needle Blight of Austrian Pine

            Author: Hulbray, R.L.
            1941; 6 pages


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INHS B21-03: Studies of Nearctic Aquatic Insects

$4.00
Authors: Ross, H.H. and T.H. Frison
1937; 43 pages.

In American literature the genus Sialis has been in confusion for some time because of the fact that all authors, except Banks, have recognized only three nearctic species, americana, nevadensis and infumata. Americana and nevadensis differ from infumata in color and sculpturing and have long been recognized correctly. Everything else has been grouped under infumata. The only effort to enlighten the problem was made by Banks, who described four species cheifly on the basis of genital characters. In spite of this prophetic indication, no other extensive work has been done.


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