INHS - Bulletins 1990s

Bulletins from the 1990s

The Illinois Natural History Survey Bulletin has been published continuously since 1876. This peer-reviewed journal reports on significant research findings by INHS scientists and others in the natural sciences. It is our premier scientific serial and has a worldwide distribution. Professional researchers and graduate students contribute to and utilize this series.

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1930s   


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INHS B36-02: Natural History of the Bird-Voiced (Hyla avivoca) and Green Treefrog (Hyla cinerea) in Southern Illinois

$10.00
Authors: Redmer, M., L.E. Brown, and R.A. Brandon; Rice, T., ed.
1999; 29 pages.

The bird-voiced treefrog, Hyla avivoca Viosca 1928, Figures 1 and 2, and green treefrog, Hyla cinerea (Schneider 1799), Figures 3 and 4, are distributed primarily on the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains of the southeastern United States (Conant and Collins 1998). The ranges of both species reach their northern limits in the Midwest in southern Illinois where Smith (1961) recorded them from Alexander, Jackson, and Union Counties. Because the few documented localities of these treefrogs in Illinois were, until recently, mainly in or near remnant Austroriparian swamplands (which are disappearing rapidly), concern has been expressed that their continued existence in the state is in jeopardy (Ackerman 1975; Ashton et al. 1976; Dyrkacz 1974). Since Smith's (1961) comprehensive study The Amphibians and Reptiles of Illinois, few additional records for these species have been reported. Garton and Brandon (1975) studied reproductive ecology and habitat of H. cinerea at a southern Illinois swamp, but there has been no previous in-depth environmental examination of H. avivoca in Illinois. The objective of this publication is to report the results of our study of the natural history of these two poorly known treefrogs in southern Illinois.


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INHS B36-01: Actue Toxicity of Ingested Zinc Shot to Game-Farm Mallards

$10.00
Authors: Levengood, J.M., G.C. Sanderson, W.L. Anderson, G.L. Foley, L.M. Skowron, P.W. Brown, and J.W. Seets; T.E. Rice, ed.
1999; 36 pages.

We conducted a 30-day acute toxicity test of zinc (Zn) shot using 6- to 8-month-old wild-type game-farm Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), 40 of which (20 males and 20 females) were dosed with 6 No. 4 candidate shot pellets containing 98% Zn and 2% tin (Sn); the remaining 40 ducks were dosed with 6 No. 4 steel (Fe) shot and served as controls. The Zn shot resulted in high mortality, with a greater proportion of females dying than males. For the 30-day study, survival averaged 18 and 23 days for female and male Zn-dosed ducks, respectively; all Fe-dosed ducks survived to Day 30. Ataxia/paresis and other signs of intoxication were noted in a large portion of Zn-dosed ducks. For all ducks retaining 6 shot pellets, including those that survived < 30 days, shot retention, percent of the original shot weight dissolved, and dissolution rates were similar for Zn- and Fe-dosed ducks. For those ducks that retained 6 pellets and survived to Day 30, percent loss of the original shot weight and the dissolution rate were higher in Zn-dosed ducks.


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INHS B35-05: Annotated Catalog of Type Specimens in the Illinois Natural History Survey Fish Collection

$10.00
Authors: Sabaj, M.H., K.S. Cummings, and L.M. Page; T.E. Rice, ed.
1997; 47 pages.

This catalog is divided into two sections: (1) type specimens presently located in the Fish Collection of the Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS), and (2) type specimens originally deposited in the Illinois State Laboratory of Natural History (ISLNH), but not currently found in the INHS collection (i.e., species whose types are either missing entirely or represented only by ISLNH specimens donated to other museums). In both sections, species and subspecies are presented alphabetically within families, and the families are arranged phylogenetically according to Nelson (1994). Photographs of type specimens are presented for 15 species described between 1876 and 1905 by S.A. Forbes, D.S. Jordan, E.W. Nelson, and R.E. Richardson. Except for Parascaphirhynchus albus Forbes and Richardson 1905, these species were not figured in their original description and photographs of the type specimens have never been published.


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INHS B35-02: The Fishes of Champaign County, Illinois, During a Century of Alterations of a Prairie Ecosystem

$10.00
Authors: Larimore, R.W. and P.B. Bayley; T.E. Rice and C. Warwick, eds.
1996; 130 pages.

1. Much of Champaign County has been converted from marsh and tallgrass prairie to well-drained fertile farmland. Its streams were modified by dredging, tiling, silting, and other influences that accompanied agriculture. 2. Stream fishes in the six drainage basins of the county were sampled in the same locations in the late 1890s, 1928, 1959-60, and 1987-88. Ninety-two species were recorded in the county during these four surveys. Eighteen species previously recorded were not collected in the recent survey. Of these 18, 16 were never common in the county and 6 are listed as Illinois endangered species. With species disappearing and new ones occurring, the total number of species collected in the most recent three (of four) surveys has remained virtually the same-73, 73, 74. 3. Based upon data from the last three surveys, tests of association and time trends indicated that 12 taxa (species or species complexes that occurred in five or more samples from two or more surveys) in a subset of 47 taxa generally increased in percentage of occurrence, while 5 taxa decreased. Ten taxa showed more complex changes and the remaining 20 taxa showed no significant association or trend. Mean species richness per sample, after correcting for gear efficiency differences, dropped drastically between 1928 and 1959 during the time that water quality deteriorated rapidly. 4. Biomass of large predatory species (mostly sportfishes) increased during the past 30 years but in the county the physical habitat apparently limits the distribution and abundance of most of these species. 5. Urban spread has taken much agricultural land and reduced water retention in the floodplains, while the reduction of cattle grazing and the use of conservation tillage have improved the streams. 6. Habitat parameters varied little among most sites. However, fish communities were distinguishable on the basis of discriminant functions related to river size that were influenced primarily by mean depth, drainage area, and specific conductance, and secondarily by riparian crops and soluble reactive phosphorous. 7. Historical evidence indicates that poor water quality was a major limiting factor for most fishes in Champaign County in the 1950s. Results from the recent survey indicate that water quality has been greatly improved during the past 30 years with the elimination of chronic pollution in seven principal areas. 8. The limiting physical habitat is still a function of land-use practices associated with agriculture, particularly channelization and channel maintenance for drainage. Although the dredged streams may never be allowed to regain the diversity of habitat that existed before channelization, some farmers and drainage engineers are limiting channel maintenance and permitting the development of instream meanders, bars, pools, and bank vegetation. Most of the fishes of Champaign County quickly respond to these habitat improvements.


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INHS B35-01: Non-Native Fishes Inhabiting the Streams and Lakes of Illinois

$10.00
Authors: Laird, C.A. and L.M. Page
1996; 51 pages.


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INHS B34-04: Our Living Heritage: The Biological Resources of Illinois

$4.00
Authors: Page, L.M. and M.R. Jeffords, eds.
1991; 120 pages.


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